Dana Graphs

Still Searching for a Suitable Title.

In Lieu of a Portfolio

The story of my life as a web developer is a long and weird one. A short version might include the fact that I’ve taken nearly two years off, and I have lost pretty much all my work that I had done prior. An addendum to that short version might mention I habitually start side projects, but I don’t always finish them. So the problem becomes, how do I prove that I know (at least a little bit about) how to code?

Projects

When I didn’t have a full dev environment on my computer, I played around with some of the live HTML/CSS/JS editors that are out there. In particular I played around with tributary.io and codepen.io. Those links include a whole bunch of false starts and things of marginal interest. However a few highlights might be:

  • Normal Distribution – Watch and a normal distribution should appear. You can play with the bins and speed. Kinda processor intensive for what it is. (d3/math)
  • Baseball Stadium Voronoi – This turned out not to be an original idea, but it is a fun one. Divide the US into regions based upon their closest MLB team. (d3/math)
  • Fantasy Basketball Visualization – A group of college friends still play fantasy basketball every year. This is the end of the season data thrown into a simple bar chart
  • Physics Game Concept – Never finished, but use arrows to move, space to restart. Avoid the other circles!
  • 2D Ball Physics – A little bit a gravity and a lot of elastic collisions. Implemented with canvas instead of SVG (unlike the previous example)

Also, a couple of D3 related projects that never made it onto either of those sites.

  • Three True Outcomes – Critics of baseball bemoan the increase in the “three true outcomes” : walks, strikeouts, and home runs. A stacked bar chart shows that indeed, the trend is clearly upward, with the last three years having 30% of plate appearances ending in one of the three outcomes.
  • Hit Distribution – Not all hits are created equal. An attempt to visualize the distribution of singles, doubles, triples, and home runs. Using a denominator of at bats the entire stack conveniently adds up to the MLB season batting average.

Conclusion

These are the summer projects that have been some semblance of completed. All of them would require more polish for me to be completely proud of them. However this serves to show that I at least have a few skills, an inquisitive mind, and love to code.

Hello World

Hello everybody, and (more likely) nobody.

The goal of this site is to renew my presence on the web. A place to give my projects a home. And (most importantly) a place to talk to myself.

A thanks to Octopress for being easy to use ~2 years after I first used it. A thanks to JohnKeith for creating a theme so I don’t have to use the classic Octopress theme (which is great, and also completely ubiquitous.